David Thompson: Pat Thai

AT A GLANCE

  • Serves 2 people

  • 125 gm fresh pat thai noodles or 100gm dried thin rice noodles (rice sticks)
  • 3 tbsp shaved palm sugar
  • 2 tbsp tamarind water
  • Dash of white vinegar (optional)
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • 3 tbsp oil
  • 4 red shallots, coarsely chopped with a pinch of salt
  • 2 eggs (some cooks will use duck eggs)
  • 30 gm yellow bean curd or firm bean curd, cut into small rectangles or squares (about 2 heaped tbsp)
  • 1 tbsp dried prawns, rinsed and dried
  • ½ tsp shredded salted radish, rinsed, dried
  • 1 tbsp coarsely crushed roasted peanuts
  • Handful of trimmed bean sprouts
  • Handful of Chinese chives, cut into 2cm lengths
  • To serve: extra bean sprouts and crushed roasted peanuts, lime wedges, roasted chilli powder and raw vegetables (such as Asian pennywort, banana blossom, cabbage or snake beans)
01   If using dried noodles, soak them in water for about 15 minutes until soft but not overly so. Meanwhile, bring a pan of water to the boil. Drain the noodles well then blanch them in the boiling water for a moment only and drain once again (this prevents the noodles from clumping together when they are stir-fried).
02   Mix the palm sugar with the tamarind, vinegar (if using), fish sauce and 1-2 tablespoons of water in a bowl, stirring until the sugar has dissolved.
03   Heat the oil in a wok over medium heat and fry the shallots until fragrant and beginning to colour. Crack in the eggs and stir for a few moments until they begin to look omelette-like.
04   Turn up the heat, then add the drained noodles and fry for about 30 seconds while breaking up the eggs. Add the tamarind syrup and simmer until it is absorbed. Mix in the bean curd, dried prawns, salted radish and peanuts then simmer, stirring, until almost dry. Add the bean sprouts and Chinese chives and stir-fry for a moment.
05   Check the seasoning: pat thai should be salty, sweet and sour. Divide between two plates and sprinkle with the extra bean sprouts and peanuts. Serve with lime wedges, roasted chilli powder and raw vegetables.
Note This recipe is from Thai Street Food by David Thompson, published by Penguin Lantern ($100, hbk), and appeared in the November 2009 issue of Australian Gourmet Traveller. The specialty ingredients used in these recipes are available from Asian supermarkets and Asian greengrocers. David Thompson’s recipes are reproduced here without Gourmet Traveller style changes.

Recipe:

DAVID THOMPSON

Photography:

EARL CARTER

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