Country terrine of pork, chicken and pistachios

AT A GLANCE

  • Serves 6 people

  • 600 gm coarsely minced pork shoulder
  • 200 gm chicken tenderloins (see note)
  • 140 gm coarsely minced pork back fat
  • 60 gm pistachios
  • ¾ small onion, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • ¼ cup (firmly packed) flat-leaf parsley leaves, coarsely chopped
  • 1 egg
  • 75 ml white wine
  • 65 ml veal glace (see note)
  • 1 tbsp Cognac
  • 1 tbsp thyme leaves, finely chopped
  • 1 large piece of pork caul fat, washed and soaked in salted water for 3 hours (see note)
  • To serve: fruit chutney, cornichons and crusty bread
01   Combine all ingredients except caul, chutney, cornichons and bread in a large bowl, working well with a large wooden spoon (5 minutes). Season to taste with 1 tbsp sea salt and freshly ground white pepper.
02   Preheat oven to 220C. Line a 30cm-rectangular terrine mould or loaf tin with caul, allowing it to overhang the sides, and fill with pork mixture. Fold the caul over and tuck it along the sides so the top of the terrine has no joins and is completely sealed. Cover mould. Place in a roasting pan, fill with enough hot water to come halfway up sides of mould, transfer to oven and cook for 15 minutes. Reduce oven to 140C and cook until a meat thermometer inserted into the centre reads 72C (1-1½ hours). Cool to room temperature, then refrigerate overnight.
03   Remove terrine from mould (you may need to warm the mould by dipping it into a warm water bath first). Clean jelly and residual fat from the outside with absorbent paper, thinly slice and serve with chutney, cornichons and crusty bread.
Note Must Winebar uses Mount Barker chicken. Veal glace is available from select butchers and delicatessens. Pork caul fat is available from select butchers, you may need to order ahead.

Recipe:

RUSSELL BLAIKIE, MUST WINEBAR

Photography:

JASON LOUCAS

Styling:

LISA FEATHERBY AND GERALDINE MUNOZ

Drinking Suggestion:

A LIGHT PINOT NOIR WILL COMPLEMENT THE DELICACY OF THE TERRINE WITHOUT OVERPOWERING, WHILE THE SAVOURY EDGE OF BURGUNDY GIVES A CERTAIN RUSTICITY THAT WORKS WELL WITH LIGHTER MEAT TERRINES. , suggested by EMMA SPUTORE

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