Meet Your Maker: Carpenter's Daughter

Author: Maggie Scardifield
Photography: Marcel Aucar

Making a mess has never looked so good.

After studying commercial cookery and visual communication, Camille Moir-Smith started her own design consultancy, Yolk Studio, specialising in hospitality. "Alongside the graphic and interior elements, we designed uniforms to tie our work together visually," she says. That was the beginning of Carpenter's Daughter, Moir-Smith's range of minimalist cross-back aprons for florists, ceramicists, baristas and cooks (chefs from Shannon Bennett's Lui Bar and Circa restaurant are fans). The sturdy aprons, which feature double-riveted straps, are made by hand in her Northcote studio using materials that only get better with age, such as Italian leather and solid Australian brass.

Why did you start Carpenter's Daughter?
I have a strong fascination with the state people get in when they're doing something they're passionate about; I love watching people during those moments of intense focus and drive. It also allowed me to network with people in all sorts of professions I admire.

Tools of the trade.

Why are aprons so important to craftspeople?
I believe a uniform allows lone workers to feel connected to a larger professional tribe. I wanted to nurture this by designing something that allowed people to mentally arrive at work.

What makes a good apron, Camille?
It should feel natural, comfortable and be able to handle the nature of the wearer's work, with the bonus of looking good and ageing well. I love seeing the aprons in artistic studios covered in paint or hardened by clay, and among overgrown greenhouses.

Carpenter's Daughter aprons from $180; carpentersdaughter.co







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